*** VENOMOUS ***

** Note: At one time, the Timber Rattlesnake & Canebrake Rattlesnake were considered separate subspecies, however this is no longer the case.


Venomous Snake Bite Information

Common Name: Timber Rattlesnake
Scientific Name: Crotalus horridus
Etymology:
Genus: Crotalus is derived from the Latin word crotalum which means "rattle".
 Species: horrid is Latin for 'dreadful'.
Vernacular Names: American viper, bastard rattlesnake, black rattlesnake, common rattlesnake, eastern rattlesnake, great yellow rattlesnake, mountain rattlesnake, northern banded rattlesnake, northern rattlesnake, pit viper, rock rattlesnake, velvet tail, yellow rattlesnake.
Average Length: 30 - 60 in. (90 - 152 cm)
Virginia Record Length:  67.1 in. (170.5 cm)
Record length: 74.5 in. (189.2 cm)

 

Timber rattlesnake populations:

Virginia Wildlife Action Plan Rating Tier IV - Moderate Conservation Need - The species may be rare in parts of its range, particularly on the periphery. Populations of these species have demonstrated a significant declining trend or one is suspected which, if continued, is likely to qualify this species for a higher tier in the foreseeable future. Long-term planning is necessary to stabilize or increase populations.

 

Southeastern "Canebrake" populations:

Virginia Wildlife Action Plan Rating Tier II - Very High Conservation Need - Has a high risk of extinction or extirpation. Populations of these species are at very low levels, facing real threat(s), or occur within a very limited distribution. Immediate management is needed for stabilization and recovery.

 

Click to view the 2011 DGIF Canebrake Rattlesnake Conservation Plan

 

Virginia Fish and Wildlife Information Service: Species Booklet  *Note the distribution given within the Species Booklet includes historical records.

Photos:

*Click on a thumbnail for a larger version.

 
 
 
 
Pulaski Co.
Douthat State Park
Douthat State Park
DGIF Timber Rattlesnake Video
       
Pulaski Co.
   
           
Male Guarding
Males will often defend their mate from other males, but we have never seen it to this extreme. This 5ft. male is literally curled-up and sitting on the female. You can barely see the edge of the 4ft. female under him.