Frog ID Keys - Pseudacris (Spring Peeper, Grass & Chorus Frogs)

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  • Mountain Chorus Frog (Pseudacris brachyphona)

  • Brimley's Chorus Frog (Pseudacris brimleyi)

  • Northern Spring Peeper (Pseudacris crucifer crucifer)

  • Upland Chorus Frog (Pseudacris feriarum)

  • New Jersey Chorus Frog (Pseudacris feriarum kalmi)

  • Southern Chorus Frog (Pseudacris nigrita)

  • Little Grass Frog (Pseudacris ocularis)

Mountain Chorus Frog (Pseudacris brachyphona)

The mountain chorus frog reaches a maximum SVL of 38 mm. Dorsal stripes curving and bending toward the centerline. In some individuals the two curved stripes bend inward so far that they touch at the centerline, creating a crude dark 'X' shape. A dark triangle between the eyes is almost always present. As in most chorus frogs there is a while line on the upper lip. Yellowish pigment is present on the concealed and ventral surfaces of the legs. With hindlimb adpressed, the heel reaches a point anterior to the middle of the eye.


Known distribution ofPseudacris brachyphona in Virginia

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Brimley's Chorus Frog (Pseudacris brimleyi)

The Brimley's Chorus Frog reaches a maximum SVL of 32 mm. The base color of this frog is variable, but usually brownish yellow. Bold black stripes extend down each side of the body, from the snout, through the eye to the groin without interruption. The middorsal stripes are often paler that the two outer stripes. The chest is usually spotted. Unlike most other chorus frogs, the dark triangle between the eyes is absent.


Known distribution of Pseudacris brimleyi in Virginia

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Northern Spring Peeper (Pseudacris crucifer crucifer)

The northern spring peeper reaches a maximum SVL of 37mm. The base coloration of the frog varies greatly from yellowish, brown, olive to gray. The dark cross on the back is usually imperfect and in darker specimens fairly difficult to see. Webs on hindlimbs are at least 1/2 the length of the digits. Light spot below eye absent.


Known distribution of Pseudacris crucifer crucifer in Virginia

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Upland Chorus Frog (Pseudacris feriarum)

The upland chorus frog reaches a maximum SVL of 38 mm. Pattern variable, usually with spots or weakly striped lines. With hindlimb adpressed, the heel reaches a point posterior to the eye.


Known distribution of Pseudacris feriarum in Virginia

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New Jersey Chorus Frog (Pseudacris kalmi)

The New Jersey chorus frog reaches a maximum SVL of 38 mm. The background color is light brown to grayish. Three ragged, dark stripes extend from the just behind the eye, down the back to the groin. The stripes are sometimes broken. A dark triangle is sometimes present. The throat, chest and belly is whitish to cream colored.


Known distribution of Pseudacris kalmi in Virginia

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Southern Chorus Frog (Pseudacris nigrita)

The southern chorus frog reaches a maximum SVL of 32 mm.The darkest of all our chorus frogs. Markings usually black. On each side of the frog a conspicuous, continuous black strip extends from the shout, through the eye to the groin. The other three stripes near the centerline have a tendency to be discontinuous, breaking in to rows of large spots, this is especially evident in the middle one that bifurcates posteriorly. Snout pointed.


Known distribution ofPseudacris nigrita in Virginia

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Little Grass Frog (Pseudacris ocularis)

The smallest frog in North America reaching a maximum SVL of 17 mm. Dark stripe passing through the eye. Often a narrow, dark middorsal stripe starting as a triangle between the eyes and extending to the anal region.


Known distribution of Pseudacris ocularis in Virginia

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FROGS

Virginia is home to 28 species of frogs and toads.

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We have a large diversity of salamanders consisting of 56 different species and subspecies.

LIZARDS

Virginia is home to 9 native lizard species and two introduced species, the Mediterranean Gecko and the Italian Wall Lizard.

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The Commonwealth is home to 34 species and subspecies of snake. Only 3 species are venomous.

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